Buy Do-It-Yourself Java Games at Amazon

Do you like playing computer games? Do you enjoy solving puzzles? Do you delight in figuring things out yourself, given enough clues or hints? If so, you may enjoy computer programming.

Are you a hands-on kind of person? Would you rather get started on a project right away instead of first reading long chapters about how things work? Do you lose interest if too much technical information is presented at a time? If so, my newest book Do-It-Yourself Java Games: An Introduction to Java Computer Programming may be the right book for you.

Writing your own computer games provides challenges, enjoyment, and satisfaction similar to playing computer games. Similar to playing games, programming teaches you to think logically and systematically. It teaches you planning skills and problem solving skills. Programming a computer gives you power and control: a program will do exactly what you program it to do. Programming also teaches you to be precise and clear in your instructions: a program will do exactly what you program it to do, whether that is what you intended or not.

I enjoy programming and would like to encourage others to try it too.  I wrote this book for junior high to high school students as well as adults to explore an interest in computer programming.

Do-It-Yourself Java Games uses a unique “discovery learning” approach to teach computer programming: learn Java programming techniques more by doing Java programming than by reading about them. Through extensive use of fill-in blanks, with easy one-click access to answers, you will be guided to write complete programs yourself, starting with the first lesson. You’ll create puzzle and game programs like Choose An Adventure, Secret Code, Hangman, Crazy Eights, and many more, and discover how, when, and why Java programs are written the way they are.

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More Do-It-Yourself Java Games

More Do-It-Yourself Java Games: An Introduction to Java Graphics and Event-Driven Programming is the second book of the Do-It-Yourself Java Games series. You'll learn to create windows and dialogs, to add buttons and input fields, to use images and drawings, and to respond to keyboard input and mouse clicks and drags. You'll create 10 more games including several puzzles, a dice game, a word game, and a card game.

This book assumes you either have an understanding of basic Java programming or you have read the first book, Do-It-Yourself Java Games: An Introduction to Java Computer Programming. Read more.

Do-It-Yourself Java Games

Do-It-Yourself Java Games: An Introduction to Java Computer Programming uses a unique "discovery learning" approach to teach computer programming: learn Java programming techniques more by doing Java programming than by reading about them.

Through extensive use of fill-in blanks, with easy one-click access to answers, you will be guided to write complete programs yourself, starting with the first lesson. You'll create puzzle and game programs like Choose An Adventure, Secret Code, Hangman, Crazy Eights, and many more, and discover how, when, and why Java programs are written the way they are. Read more

Step-by-Step Tutorial

Many of the tips, techniques, and tools discussed in this blog are demonstrated in a detailed step-by-step tutorial in the book, This Little Program Went to Market, by Annette Godtland.

The book takes a computer program through the entire process of creating, deploying and distributing a program, then selling and marketing it (or any other product) on the Internet. Read more.